Tag Archives: data security

Power BI Data Security – Sharing in Email

 

Power BI Security LogoMicrosoft has expanded sharing by allowing users to share Power BI content via email. In a previous post, I discussed how sharing content within your organization should be handled carefully. However, the new process opens up the opportunity to share outside your organization by sending an email. In particular, you can now share with users who have a personal email address such as @outlook.com and @gmail.com. Let’s dig into the implications of this capability.

Sharing Using Email

First, you need to be aware that this functionality is as simple as the original methods of sharing. You click the Share button on your report or dashboard to open the Share dialog.

The Share report dialog in this case accepts email addresses which is not a significant change. However, as shown below, you can add personal emails and emails outside your organization. You be warned, but users do not always pay attention to this or understand the implications.

Share report - outside

You will also notice that consumers need to still have a Power BI Pro account assigned to them or you need to be using Power BI Premium for this to work.

Following the Email Process

When you share, you usually will need to send an email to the recipient. Here is the email content.

Report Share EmailTime to click the report link. This opens a series of dialogs which determine how much you have access. It is important to note that this is all made possible with Azure B2B. More about that in a moment. Let’s trace the story through. The link opens the following page.

Report Share Email - Welcome Link

As you can see, the next step is to log in. I am using an outlook.com account so it prompts me to authenticate. Once I have authenticated, I get the following notice.

Report Share Email - Opened Report

My account does not have Power BI Pro, but now I can try it for free for 60 days and get access to the data while I am on the trial. I clicked both options, because I can. The Upgrade account option would require me to pay for Pro. However, Try Pro for free works and I was able to access the report fully. I have successfully shared my corporate content with a personal user.

Preventing Sharing Outside Your Organization

While in some cases, you need to share outside your organization, we will assume here you need to disable this functionality. There are a few places you can make this happen.

Power BI Admin Portal

First, in Power BI go to the Admin portal and disable sharing outside your organization. If you have followed my previous advice, this will already be disabled.

 

PBI Admin Portal - Disable Sharing

As you can see, this will disable content for users who have been shared with previously. If you need to share, you can specify groups that have that permission.

Office 365 Admin Center

Next, this can be turned off in the Office 365 Admin Center in the Security and privacy area.

PBI O365 Admin Center - Disable Sharing

This prevents the ability to add guest users to the organization. This will disable this capability across Office 365. There is no option to allow some users this access. Once this is disabled, sharing outside the organization which requires a guest user will not be possible.

Azure Active Directory

Finally, you can shut this down from Azure Active Directory. Guest users are ultimately managed through Azure Active Directory and this is the best place to turn this off corporately if you do not need this functionality.

PBI AAD - Disable Sharing

In AAD you have four options.

  1. Guest users permissions are limited. This limits guest user capabilities with regard to the directory. Yes is the default and recommended.
  2. Admins and users in the guest inviter role can invite. This would be a typical option we can understand. However, it is important to note that Admin users in Power BI workspaces will have the ability to create guest users and share reports externally with this permission on.
  3. Members can invite. Just like it sounds. Any member of a group can invite guest users in.
  4. Guests can invite. This allows guests to invite other guests. Seems dangerous to me.

As you can see from my tenant, the options are all on which is the default. Be sure to understand what capability you want to use and set it appropriately within your tenant.

Tracking Sharing

In the Office 365 logging, you can see who and what has been shared. This log covers internal and external shares and should be monitored for auditing and compliance purposes.

Azure B2B

Azure B2B and the sharing capabilities in Power BI go hand in hand. This allows organizations to share content in a controlled fashion to consumers outside their organization. While this is required for certain scenarios, be mindful of who has the capability to share, and track sharing to make sure the data is being handled as you require.

Final Thoughts and References

You need to remember that sharing is at the heart of Power BI and you need to manage how and who can share. If you need to do more extensive sharing, by all means, use these features. For those, who need to lock it down tighter, you can follow the steps above to prevent sharing until you have a process and pattern. Power BI continues to improve and grow and as that happens we can expect more security options to support the new functionality. Enjoy Power BI, it is a great tool and will only continue to get better.

References

Using Azure AD B2B with Power BI

Auditing Power BI

Share your Power BI content with anyone by email

 

 

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Power BI Data Security – Sharing

Power BI Security LogoMicrosoft recently added more sharing capabilities that may change my view on sharing within the enterprise. As with all things Power BI, change is inevitable.

Up to this point, I recommended that customers did not use sharing as an enterprise solution due to the inability to manage it and the potential to share data within the organization that violates compliance or internal rules.

Sharing Within Your Organization

When you share a dashboard or a report within your organization, you share the data with it. Here is the issue from my perspective. If you allow users to share content, they are responsible to share responsibly. That is correct. The content creators are now responsible to manage security as well. So, let’s walk through the basics of using sharing effectively and securely within your organization.

Why Share?

The primary reason to use share is to distribute content outside the context of a Power BI App. Power BI Apps should be your first mechanism for sharing content within your organization. It requires more thought and planning which is typically a good idea with your companies data. However, there are times when sharing makes sense. With the ability to share reports, you can limit sharing to specific areas. Also, you may want to create a “one-off” report for use in decision making but not something to be deployed in the long term.

Sharing is very different from deploying Apps. App deployment is not that difficult to do, but prevents sharing and is much easier to manage access.

The Process of Sharing

Sharing capabilities are readily available on any content that you create.

At this point, there is no way to prevent sharing within your organization. Content can be shared from My Workspace as well.

The first step to sharing is to click the Share button on the report or dashboard you want to share.

PBI Share Button

This will launch a dialog for sharing the report or dashboard as shown here:

PBI Share Dialog

I have highlighted a couple of key parts to the dialog. The first is that you can share with individuals, distribution lists, and security groups. This is similar to the permissions you can apply to an App during deployment. As a content creator, I can distribute in this fashion. Typically power users who create content will use individual names or distribution lists as they are the most common methods of working with teams.

The next part to understand is the Allow recipients to share your report option. I have a couple of issues with this option. First, it is on by default. This means if someone shares with a peer in their department that individual can then share outside their department. The original content creator no longer has control of who this is shared to when this option is turned on which is my second issue. While the content creator will be able to see everyone they share with in the Access panel of the dialog when they review it later, they have potentially released data “into the wild” without controls if they do not set this up properly.

Click Share. You have successfully shared your report. Next, let’s have a look at the Access panel after the share is done. This panel is used view and manage sharing within the workspace.

PBI Share - Access Dialog

When in this dialog you can see who has what level of access to the report or dashboard you are currently in. You will see all reshares here as well. This will allow the content creator to remove access if needed.

The Manage permissions link opens up a dialog that lets you view and manage permissions for the entire workspace.

PBI Share - Manage Access

As you can see, sharing is managed by content creators. It will be important for them to understand the process.

Monitoring Sharing

Your Power BI environment should have auditing turned on. This will allow you to run reports to understand who has shared reports and dashboards across the tenant. This will be required to manage auditing and compliance within your organization.

Sharing and Security Thoughts

As I worked through this capability, there are a couple of closing thoughts on security to keep in mind.

  1. You cannot prevent sharing. You must monitor it, so be sure you have auditing turned on in your subscription.
  2. This has a place when sharing on a smaller scale. I would not recommend it as the standard process, but it allows you to share content in smaller chunks.
  3. You must have a process and policy for sharing. This has to be understood by content creators.
  4. If you implement row-level security in Power BI or SSAS, it is honored in sharing. This will prevent unauthorized access to sensitive data. Use this when you have particularly sensitive data in use.

One other thought. If this is a significant concern, you should evaluate Power BI Premium as it will allow to manage which users have the capability to create and share content. Free users are effectively read only within the organization. This will be cost-prohibitive for smaller organizations unless security is the primary concern.

Properly planned for you will be able to share effectively with Apps as a deployment model.

Power BI and Data Security – Row Level Security (RLS)

Power BI Security LogoAs Power BI becomes more prevalent in data analytics and visualization within the enterprise, data security becomes a significant concern. Power BI at its best is deployed to the Power BI service hosted on Microsoft’s Azure platform. Every enterprise should understand the level of security available with their data. Companies who have made the leap to cloud technologies such as AWS, Microsoft Azure, Salesforce, and Microsoft Office 365 should have an understanding of the data compliance and security capabilities of those solutions. However, companies who want to take advantage of Power BI but have just started their cloud journey or are cloud adverse need to know the nuances of Power BI and security.

I have been involved with data and cloud security questions a lot of the past few years. With Power BI’s rise in significance, I have had to answer more specific questions about the service. In order to provide proper guidance and not have a reference for myself, I am putting together a short series of posts on various data security items in Power BI. The topics included enterprise gateway, privacy levels, data classification, and compliance. The focus of these articles are related to using the Power BI service as this is the cloud implementation of Power BI. The desktop has setting which impact deployment of assets, but is not the focus of this series.

The Power BI service is updated frequently. These articles were created based on the Power BI implementation in early April 2017. You may find improvements and changes that impact your experience that are based on newer releases. Feel free to add comments to highlight changes.

Row Level Security in Power BI

Row level security is the ability to filter content based on a users role. There are two primary ways to implement row level security in Power BI – through Power BI or using SSAS. Power BI has the ability in the desktop to create roles based on DAX filters which affect what users see in the various assets in Power BI.

In order for this to work, you will need to deploy to a Workspace where users only have read permissions. If the members of the group associated to the Workspace have edit permissions, row level security in Power BI will be ignored.

Power BI Manage Roles.png

Both DirectQuery and data loaded into the model support RLS is the manner described above.

LiveConnection

SQL Server Analysis Services implements RLS on its own. SSAS requires the enterprise gateway to implement LiveConnection and RLS. RLS is supported by using EffectiveUserName on the connection from Power BI to the on-premises SSAS instance. (Refer to documentation on setting up live connections to SSAS.) This method works for both multidimensional and tabular models.

References

BI SSAS Connector Deep Dive (older content but good information)

Power BI SSAS Tabular Data

Power BI Admin for RLS

Power BI Row Level Security

Row-Level Security for Cloud models and DirectQuery

Tabular Model Row Level Security White Paper

 

 

Power BI and Data Security – Data Classification and Privacy Levels

Power BI Security Logo

As Power BI becomes more prevalent in data analytics and visualization within the enterprise, data security becomes a significant concern. Power BI at its best is deployed to the Power BI service hosted on Microsoft’s Azure platform. Every enterprise should understand the level of security available with their data. Companies who have made the leap to cloud technologies such as AWS, Microsoft Azure, Salesforce, and Microsoft Office 365 should have an understanding of the data compliance and security capabilities of those solutions. However, companies who want to take advantage of Power BI but have just started their cloud journey or are cloud adverse need to know the nuances of Power BI and security.

I have been involved with data and cloud security questions a lot of the past few years. With Power BI’s rise in significance, I have had to answer more specific questions about the service. In order to provide proper guidance and not have a reference for myself, I am putting together a short series of posts on various data security items in Power BI. The topics included enterprise gateway, privacy levels, data classification, and compliance. The focus of these articles are related to using the Power BI service as this is the cloud implementation of Power BI. The desktop has setting which impact deployment of assets, but is not the focus of this series.

The Power BI service is updated frequently. These articles were created based on the Power BI implementation in early April 2017. You may find improvements and changes that impact your experience that are based on newer releases. Feel free to add comments to highlight changes.

The following items are part of the series because they imply additional levels of data security. In order to help alleviate confusion on the implementation and use of data classification and privacy levels I have included them in the conversation.

Power BI Data Classification

Data classification is a method available in Power BI which allows users to tag dashboards to alert consumers of the data to sensitivity in the data. Data classifications are enabled and configured at the tenant level. Once established, a visible tag will be present on dashboards.

PBI Data Classification

Data classification is not a data security implementation. Data classification is only a tag for dashboards and can only be applied on the service not on Power BI Desktop. If you plan to implement this feature you need to have matching policies and practices to support its use.

Power BI Privacy Levels

Power BI Privacy Levels “specify an isolation level that defines the degree that one data source will be isolated from other data sources”. After working through some testing scenarios and trying to discover the real impact to data security, I was unable to effectively show how this might have any bearing on data security in Power BI. During one test was I shown a warning about using data from a website with data I had marked Organizational and Private. In all cases, I was able to merge the data in the query and in the relationships with no warning or filtering. All of the documentation makes the same statement and most bloggers are restating what is found in the Power BI documentation as were not helpful. My takeaway after reviewing this for a significant amount of time is to not consider these settings when evaluating data security in Power BI. I welcome comments or additional references which actually demonstrate how this isolation actually works in practice. In most cases, we are using organizational data within our Power BI solutions and will not be impacted by this setting and my find improved performance when disabling it.

Here is the only instance where I was prompted about privacy levels while working with this. After marking it “public” I proceeded to merge the data with a private connection. You may have a different experience that what I have and I would welcome comments to further the discussion on this topic.

Privacy Level Setting Dialog.PNG

References

Dashboard Data Classification

Power BI Desktop Privacy Levels

Power Query (Excel) Privacy Level Settings

Power BI Community Response on Privacy Levels

March 2016 Power BI Desktop Update – Search for Privacy Level

Power BI and Data Security – On-premises Data Gateway

Power BI Security Logo

As Power BI becomes more prevalent in data analytics and visualization within the enterprise, data security becomes a significant concern. Power BI at its best is deployed to the Power BI service hosted on Microsoft’s Azure platform. Every enterprise should understand the level of security available with their data. Companies who have made the leap to cloud technologies such as AWS, Microsoft Azure, Salesforce, and Microsoft Office 365 should have an understanding of the data compliance and security capabilities of those solutions. However, companies who want to take advantage of Power BI but have just started their cloud journey or are cloud adverse need to know the nuances of Power BI and security.

I have been involved with data and cloud security questions a lot of the past few years. With Power BI’s rise in significance, I have had to answer more specific questions about the service. In order to provide proper guidance and not have a reference for myself, I am putting together a short series of posts on various data security items in Power BI. The topics included enterprise gateway, privacy levels, data classification, and compliance. The focus of these articles are related to using the Power BI service as this is the cloud implementation of Power BI. The desktop has setting which impact deployment of assets, but is not the focus of this series.

The Power BI service is updated frequently. These articles were created based on the Power BI implementation in early April 2017. You may find improvements and changes that impact your experience that are based on newer releases. Feel free to add comments to highlight changes.

Power BI Gateway

The On-premises Data Gateway (a.k.a. Enterprise Gateway)

First, I will not be discussing the personal gateway in this post. If you have chosen to use the personal gateway, you have limited functionality and should consider using the on-premises data gateway for corporate use.

The on-premises data gateway (referred to as gateway throughout this post) “acts as a bridge, providing quick and secure data transfer between on-premises data and the Power BI, Microsoft Flow, Logic Apps, and PowerApps services.” (ref) Much of what is discussed here will apply to all of the services referenced above, but our primary concern is related to Power BI. Please refer to references at the end of this post for details about data sources supported within the gateway.

The gateway enables Power BI to use on-premises data for data refresh and direct access with Direct Query and Live Connections (SSAS multidimensional and tabular models). The gateway is used to manage connectivity and data transfer between on-premises data and Power BI with data compression and transport encryption capabilities as part of the solution. Our focus here is related to the most common questions related to the gateway’s use with Power BI. We will discuss security related to the gateway and then to how the data is secure when using the gateway.

Security on the Gateway

When the gateway is installed, the default service account NT Service\PBIEgwService is created as a Windows service logon credential. This credential has “log on as a service” permissions. The first item to note: this credential is NOT used to access data sources. This service account has localized permissions to the server or PC it is installed on. It has no permissions to on-premises data sources or cloud services that use it.

In some situations, this can create issues with proxy servers. If you run into this situation, you can change the account to a domain account. Refer to the proxy configuration documentation to make that change. The recommendation is to change this to a managed service account in Active Directory to avoid resetting passwords which will disable the gateway and likely cause user satisfaction issues.

Data Sources in the Gateway

While the gateway does not have access to services or data sources, it does have the capability to decrypt the connection information used by Power BI to connect to on-premises services. When you add data source to the gateway you created, the credentials are encrypted using the key from the gateway.

Power BI Gateway Data Sources

Each gateway can manage multiple data sources. (NOTE: Best practices about location and performance of the gateway are not in scope of this post.) In my example, the gateway is providing access to a folder which contains receipt files. This will allow my Power BI solution to refresh data from the source. I can add a SQL Server connection as well if it is in the same network or context. The key here is that the gateway is an entry point for your on-premises data and is not limited to a single data source.

Credentials stored with the gateway cannot be decrypted in the cloud. The credentials are only decrypted by the gateway. When considering maintenance and configuration it is important to know that this is one of the key purposes of the gateway. Without a gateway, Power BI cannot access data in your on-premises solution. (Gateways are also required for Azure IaaS solutions. However, Azure SQL Database and Azure SQL DW do not require gateways as they are PaaS solutions and managed differently within Azure.)

Gateway Communication

All data and information between the gateway and Power BI is encrypted. One of the primary concerns is around opening ports and the communication protocol that supports this communication.

The first important item to cover is that there are no inbound ports used by the gateway. The gateway creates an outbound connection to the Azure Service Bus using a specific set of ports including TCP 443 which is used for Power BI (complete list of ports used). It is possible to force the gateway to use HTTPS in lieu of direct TCP for all of its communication. If you require this as an organization, be aware that there may be performance issues. This setting can be changed in the gateway properties and will require a restart of the service.

gw-onprem_01
Image Source: Power BI Documentation – On-premises data gateway

 

Data and the Gateway

The second primary question in regards to the gateway is around how data is handled. When a request from Power BI is submitted for data, the Azure Service Bus holds the request with the encrypted credentials. The on-premises data gateway polls the Azure Service Bus for requests. Once the request is received by the on-premises gateway, the connection is decrypted and the query request sent to the appropriate resource. The data is then encrypted and compressed at the gateway and returned to Power BI.

No data is stored in the gateway and the data is encrypted for transit.

Users and the Gateway

One last consideration is related to who can use a gateway. In Power BI service, when you manage the gateway (see diagram above about Data Sources), you have the ability to manage access to data sources by user. This functionality also supports security groups. When implemented, only users who have access to the data source can use the data source for Power BI datasets that they are deploying. This will prevent users from publishing content that would require direct access or data refresh to sources they should not use.

When they are able to use the gateway, they will have access to refresh scheduling and other options via the dataset properties (I use the Schedule Refresh option to open the dialog).

Datasets and Gateways.png

Final Thoughts

There are a lot of considerations for enterprises who plan to implement gateways in their organizations. The key is to remember this is a bridge that allows on-premises data to be accessed by cloud services. However, the cloud services do not initiate a direct request to the on-premises data. Microsoft has done a great job allowing for a hybrid approach that enables organizations to take advantage of cloud resources while minimizing the impact to their on-premises assets.

References

On-premises data gateway, March 16, 2017

Power BI Gateway Proxy

Power BI Gateways – March 2017 Update