Category Archives: SQL Saturday

SQL Saturday #437–Boston BI Edition 2015–You Can Still Analyze Data with T-SQL


Thanks for attending my session on analyzing data with TSQL. I hope you learned something you can take back and use in your projects or at your work. You will find an link to the session and code I used below. If you have any questions about the session post them in comments and I will try to get you the answers.

The presentation can be found here: Analyzing with TSQL

The code was put into a Word document that you can get here: Code to support the analysis with TSQL Sessions

This session is also backed by an existing blog series I have written.

T-SQL Window Functions – Part 1- The OVER() Clause

T-SQL Window Functions – Part 2- Ranking Functions

T-SQL Window Functions – Part 3: Aggregate Functions

T-SQL Window Functions – Part 4- Analytic Functions

Microsoft Resources:

SQL Saturday #453–Minnesota 2015–A Window Into Your Data


Thanks for attending my session on window functions in TSQL. I hope you learned something you can take back and use in your projects or at your work. You will find an link to the session and code I used below. If you have any questions about the session post them in comments and I will try to get you the answers.

The presentation can be found here: A Window into Your Data

The code was put into a Word document that you can get here: TSQL Window Function Code

This session is also backed by an existing blog series I have written.

T-SQL Window Functions – Part 1- The OVER() Clause

T-SQL Window Functions – Part 2- Ranking Functions

T-SQL Window Functions – Part 3: Aggregate Functions

T-SQL Window Functions – Part 4- Analytic Functions

Microsoft Resources:

Power Testing ETL with Power BI – Creating the Tests with Power Pivot

PowerTool_1This is the second deep dive into Power Testing ETL with Power BI. At this point, we have created the source table which will be used in our testing. The next step is to bring in the destination table and create the tests that will be “run” against the data. In its simplest form the tests are created using logical conditions based on whether source data matches destination data and calculations applied to those data sets also match. When they don’t match, you have data load error which results in a failed test.

How to Calculate Success and Failure

The basics of the testing is turn the results into numbers and calculate if and how much we succeeded or failed. Typically, every test will result in a 1 or 0. Whether you assign 1 to success or failure is largely dependent on how you plan to display your results. If you plan to use KPIs built into the Power Pivot model, you will be comparing the number of successful tests against the number of rows expected to be imported. The primary reason for this is that you cannot target zero when using KPIs. In this scenario, successful tests result in 1 and are therefore easily compared to the number of expected rows which would be 100% successful if they matched.

The other scenario is to measure failures. In this case, we assign 1 to each failed test and count the number of failed tests. This can easily be handled in visualizations such as conditional formatting where 0 can be displayed as green and the number of failures change the state from from green to yellow then red. This helps identify the most commonly failed tests.

The method you choose is up to you and how you prefer to see the results. We will cover using both variations in visualizations, but for sake of brevity here, we will measure success against our row count. Success = 1; Failure = 0.

Creating the Power Pivot Tests

In order to create the tests, you need to open the Power Pivot window and add the destination table to the model. In our case we have created a table in the HughesMediaLibrary database called books that is our target. Here is the syntax for the target table.

BookName varchar(100) NOT NULL,
Publisher varchar(100) NULL,
Genre varchar(50) NULL,
CopyrightYear smallint NULL,
AuthorFName1 varchar(100) NULL,
AuthorLName1 varchar(100) NULL,
AuthorFName2 varchar(100) NULL,
AuthorLName2 varchar(100) NULL,
AuthorFName3 varchar(100) NULL,
AuthorLName3 varchar(100) NULL,
AuthorFName4 varchar(100) NULL,
AuthorLName4 varchar(100) NULL,
AuthorFName5 varchar(100) NULL,
AuthorLName5 varchar(100) NULL,
PageCount int NULL

While I realize this is not a good normalized table, it serves our purposes well to build out the tests. This table needs to be added to the Power Pivot model before we can do the next steps.

Relating the Source and Destination

The next step is to relate the source and destination. In our case, the only data that will work is the book name. We will use the Source table as the primary table in this relationship. The idea is that all the data in the source table should exist in the target. As this is not always the case, the source is the “source of truth” for the testing scenario.


Building the Tests

The tests are comprised of calculated columns that handle data analysis and calculated measures which summarize results.

Validating Data Field by Field,  Row by Row

This is the primary reason that we worked with Power BI. One of the most common testing scenarios is whether the data came over correctly. In the previous post, we shaped the data with Power Query. Now we will compare it with the results from our ETL process in SSIS. We will use Book Name as the example. Every field you wish to test can follow this pattern. The test consists of a calculated column and a calculated measure.

We create a column in the destination table called Book Name Matches. (Remember we are tracking success not failures.) In each row of the data we need determine that the book name in the destination is the exact match for the book name in our source. We used the following DAX for that calculation:

=IF(RELATED(‘Booklist Source Fixes'[BookName])=’Media Library – Books'[BookName],1,0)

It looks at the related table to determine that the field names match. If they match, the test is assigned a 1 for that row. If they do not match, a 0 is assigned. (The table names are how I named the source and destination. They may not match your solution if you are following along.) Once we have the rows evaluated, we will sum the values with a Book Name Matches measure:

Book Name Matches (34):=SUM([Book Name Mismatch])

We will use the Book Name Matches (34) measure to compare with the book count. If they match, all tests passed. If they do not, then some or all rows have failed.

The number after the measure, 34, is the test key from TFS. I added this into the measure to make it easier to identify which test case is being evaluated with this measure. In some cases, you may have multiple measures that are required to complete a test. You can either evaluate them independently or create and additional measure that summarizes them for your use.

Other Validations or Tests

Some other basic validations can be created as well. A common one would the book count. In my scenario, I return the book count then evaluate it using a KPI. Another way to do this is to add another measure that checks for equality between the two book count measures in the source and destination. If they match, success. If not, failure.

You can also use measures to validate expected totals the same way we were working with counts. This is particularly helpful in financial data loads where you would want to verify a sum of balances to make sure the results match. The point is that you can add any other measures that you want to compare in order to meet the unique needs of your situation. It is also possible that you can compare to entered values. If you know that 100 widgets are to be imported, you can have the measure evaluate against 100 instead of  a measure in the source.

Recording the Results in TFS

In order to bring the process full circle, we enter test results into TFS or Visual Studio Online. This allows us the ability to track test results, bugs, and fixes in a development lifecycle tool. It is also the best way to track testing history. One caveat here is that the query results from TFS do not permit you to set test results in Excel. Ideally, we should be able to link in the tests with the results. We could then update the results in the query and push it back. This is NOT supported at the moment. As a result, you will need to open the tests in TFS to update your results. This is not a significant issue because you should also create bugs for failed tests. It’s primarily a nuisance.

An added side effect of using this method to test is that we are able to collaborate with developers to determine what the bug actually is. Because all the data is loaded into Excel reviewing results is fairly simple and may actually be easier than trying to look at the destination system.

Quick Look at SSIS

Up to this point, we have focused on how an non-developer can set up the source and destination and proceed to test. I wanted to call out the author name work done in Power Query to highlight why Power BI is a great choice. When splitting author names, the work was done using right-click operations. Here is an example of the expression code used to split out the second author name column:

(DT_STR,200,1252)TRIM((FINDSTRING(AuthorNames,”,”,1) == 0 ? NULL(DT_WSTR,200) : TRIM(SUBSTRING(AuthorNames,FINDSTRING(AuthorNames,”,”,1) + 1,FINDSTRING(AuthorNames,”,”,2) == 0 ? LEN(AuthorNames) : 1 + LEN(AuthorNames) – FINDSTRING(AuthorNames,”,”,2)))))

Compared to Power Query, this is complex and not intuitive. While Power Query is not intended for enterprise ETL use, it’s simplicity helps test complex scenarios such as our author name split without having to create and equally complex SQL statement or expression.

The next post will take a look at some of the visualization options for the test results.

Power Testing ETL with Power BI – Shaping The Data with Power Query and Power Pivot

PowerTool_1This blog post digs into the details of shaping the data with Power Query and Power Pivot in order to build out the test cases. In the previous post, you were able to get a sense of the bigger picture and how the pieces work together. This post will focus entirely on creating the source table that will be used.

One of the most difficult parts of testing the data in an ETL process is that the data needs to be transformed to match the results of the ETL process. Typically this is done using a combination of tools including SQL, Excel, and even Access. The solution I am proposing will use Power Query to do the initial massaging of the data and Power Pivot to put any finishing touches in place.

Understanding the Requirements

The first thing that has to be understood are the requirements. Those requirements are driven from the business rules and the Source to Target Map. Because we are focusing on a non-developer to deliver this work, we need to move away from developer centric tools and into the world of Excel and Power BI.

Building Out the Power Query Query

Power Query is an excellent choice for this work. It allows us to transform or shape the data through a series of steps. What really makes this compelling is that Power Query is a “no code” solution. Once the tester or analyst is familiar with the tool, they understand that most operations can be accomplished using short cut or right-click menus during the design process. Here is the indepth look at what it will take to take the multiple authors in the source and separate them into multiple columns using Power Query.

Step 1 – Find the data source

In our case the data source is a CSV file. You can download that file here. This link will opens an Excel file with the pipe-delimited values that will be used as the source. I would recommend saving it as a .csv file as it is easier to work with in Power Query.

Here is the data raw so you can see what we will be working with:

Wish List|John Locke Books|Thriller|0011|215|John Locke
Riders of the Pale Horse|Bethany House Publishers|Christian Fiction|1994|348|T. Davis Bunn
HTML Pocket Reference|O’Reilly|Technology|2000|92000|Jennifer Niederst
Renegade|Thomas Nelson|Juvenile Fiction|2007|245|Ted DekKer
Gutenberg to Google|Billion Soul Publishing|Missions|2009|272|James Davis
Sinner|Thomas Nelson|Suspense|2008|386|Ted DekKer
SQL Server Analysis Services 2012 Cube Development Cookbook|Packt Publishing|Technology|2013|324|Baya Dewald, Steve Hughes, Paul Turley
Troubleshooting SQL Server – A Guide for the Accidental DBA|Redgate Books|Technology|2011|358|Jonathan Kehaysias, Ted Krueger

Step 2 – Open Power Query in Excel and Connect to the CSV File


Select the Power Query tab and select the From File option on the ribbon. Pick the From CSV option. Select the booklist.csv file and click OK. The result will be a preview of the data, which in our case is all the data. You can see it has created the Source, First Row as Header and Changed Type steps. If it did not do this for you automatically, you may need to set the delimiter and specify that the header is the first row.


Step 3 – Shape the Data in Power Query to Match Our ETL Process

In Power Query, we are going to split the author list and the author names. We also will apply some trimming to the data. In all we will apply ten (10) steps to query. Power Query works like an ETL tool as it shapes or transforms the data a step at a time.

Splitting the AuthorNames column

In this step, we will create a column for each author name. Our destination supports up to five authors. Our source has up to three. Right click on the AuthorNames column, select Split Column, then By Delimiter.


You can leave the defaults in the dialog and click OK.


This will result in three columns being created as AuthorNames.1, AuthorNames.2 and AuthorNames.3. Power Query does the next step which changes the data type to match what it sees in the resulting data.

Splitting the Author’s Names into First and Last Name Column

You will need to repeat this three times, once for each AuthorNames column. What is different is that we need to match a couple of business rules:

1. Author names will be stored as AuthorFName and AuthorLName for up to 5 authors (e.g. AuthorFName1).

2. Authors with middle initials or middle names or variations thereof should store these values with the first name. For example, J.R.R. Tolkien would store “J.R.R.” in the AuthorFName column and his last name, “Tolkien”, will be stored in the AuthorLName column.

Understanding these rules clarify how we should split these columns. Like before we will select to split the AuthorNames.1 column. However, in the delimiter dialog we will use a space as a delimiter and we will also choose the right most delimiter. This will pick the first space from the right, essentially the last name and everything else will be separated.


We will repeat the process for each column. The last step for this process is to rename columns to something meaningful for us to reference later such as the target field names like AuthorFName1. This will make the steps later simpler to follow.

Trim Author First Names for Authors after First Author

The final step we need to do is to apply a trim to the AuthorFName2 and AuthorFName3 columns. When the data is split, leading spaces were retained. In my demos, this is “discovered” as a mismatch in the test scenario. This would be an example of an easy miss for someone not used to some of the nuances of ETL. Keep in mind that we will test the tests as well throughout this process. This is a simple fix in Power Query – Right Click the affected columns and select Transform then Trim. Problem solved.

At this point, we have completed our work in Power Query. Up to this point, you may have seen the results of your query in an Excel spreadsheet. You actually want to load the data to a Power Pivot model. If you right-click on the query in the Workbook Queries panel, you can change the Load To target.


Select Load to Data Model and then we will finish the source data using Power Pivot.

Step 4 – Fix Additional Issues Using Calculated Columns in Power Pivot

Open the Power Pivot model in Excel. You should see data from your Power Query query as one tab of the data. While we have massaged some of the data there are still a few data issues that need to be resolved to match business rules.

3 – Copyright years must be stored as 4 digit values.

4 – Page counts should not exceed 1000.

If you look at the source data you will notice that one of the books has a two digit year for the Copyright. This should not be imported as it does not meet the rule. In our case, we will set the value to NULL in the ETL process. The same is true for one of the book page counts, it is 92,000 which greatly exceeds the maximum page count allowed by the business rule. It too will be set to NULL. The idea here is that row value checks are easily handled in Power Pivot with DAX and calculated columns.

To resolve the copyright year issue we are using the following DAX to create a new column called “Copyright Year”:

=IF([Copyright] < 1900, BLANK(), [Copyright])

To resolve the page count issue, we use the following DAX and create a “Pages” column:

=IF([PageCount]>1000, BLANK(),[PageCount])

Now we have fixed the remaining issues that violate business rules in the Power Pivot model.

Step 5 – Add Some Calculated Measures and Columns that Can Be Used for Data Validation

The final step is to add some calculations that will help us do some basic load testing. The first is just the row count. In this case, I created two measures: Source Book Count and Source Distinct Book Count (This handles a business rule that says a title can only be imported once). We can use these measures to verify that the expected data made it from source to destination. Both of these measures were created in the calculation area in Power Pivot using the Autosum functions from the ribbon. The resulting DAX is noted below.

Source Book Count:

Source Book Count:=COUNTA([BookName])

Source Distinct Book Count:

Source Distinct Book Count:=DISTINCTCOUNT([BookName])

The last calculation we need to create is the Author Count calculated column. This needs to be a column as each row could have a different number of authors. Based on what we know with the data, we will count instances of AuthorLName columns that are not NULL to determine the number of authors.

=IF(ISBLANK([AuthorLName1]),0,1)+ IF(ISBLANK([AuthorLName2]),0,1)+ IF(ISBLANK([AuthorLName3]),0,1)

This calculation would need to be modified if the source had an row with more than three columns.

Shaping Is Complete

The source transformation is now complete in the test scenario. A key point is that no code per se was written. While some DAX was required, it was fairly straightforward and likely the most complicated part of setting up the source table for testing.

Next up, creating the tests with Power Pivot and DAX.

Traveling, Talking, and a PASS Attack Have Happened

Well, this fall has been crazy. As you may have noted from a couple of my previous posts, link to speaking and pass attack, I have been busy this fall. With multiple speaking engagements and additional travel for work, I have been on the road more than I have been home. Rather than handling each event independently, I will give some synopsis here.

SQL Saturday #235 – New York City 2013

This was my first trip to New York City which is kind of ironic since I was born in Avoca, New York and lived there for five years. I spoke on Building BI Solutions with Excel 2013. During the presentation, we had an energetic conversation about pushing more of the BI work to business users. My take is that those users know how to interpret the data better than the technology staff. Ironically, they are doing it already thanks to the prolific “Export to Excel” functionality available in most BI tools. The event was a lot of fun to participate in.

SQL Saturday #238 – Minnesota 2013

This was the first SQL Saturday in Minnesota that I did not have a lot of other responsibilities beyond speaking. I felt a little guilty, so I brought my sixteen year old son, Alex, and he volunteered in my place. Turns out he did awesome and had a great time as well. I spoke in back to back sessions to open up the day. The first session, Beyond Power Pivot – Building Tabular Model Solutions, covered the development of tabular model databases using SQL Server Data Tools and the “enterprise“ features only available in Analysis Services. The next session was “Power to the User: a Look at Power BI”. This session was a lot of fun and is a whirlwind demo of the Power BI features in Excel 2013. This was a huge event with around 400 attendees and 8 tracks. Kudos to the organizing committee for a job well done.

PASS Summit 2013

Summit this year was a good event. Due to a myriad of work related crisis, I was unable to enjoy the conference as much as I had hoped. We discussed the role of the user groups in SQL Saturdays during an organizer’s meeting. I hope that we begin to see the control of these events go back to user groups rather than treated as unrelated to user groups. As the event progressed, I was able to attend a few sessions. I am still asking for the single button install of SharePoint BI, but for now I will live with the 80 page install doc. One thing I like was having the vent in a warm location. That was definitely more enjoyable than a cold, damp Seattle fall. I still look forward to the next Summit and hope to see many of you there next year.

SQL Saturday #237 – Charlotte BI Edition 2013

Immediately following Summit was this SQL Saturday. There were a lot of big time speakers that came from the Summit and they still let me talk. This session was on using Power Pivot and Power Query to test ETL processes built with SSIS. The best part was when my computer died during the demo. When I got it restarted, an error message came up on SSIS and a number of people in the room gasped. We all knew that I would not be able to fix that right away, some moved on with half of the demo working. It all turned out okay as I had screenshots in the deck to show the changes. Overall, it was a good event and gave me a chance to see some peers one more time.

CodeMastery – Atlanta

This was the first of two CodeMastery events within a week of each other. This was a lot of fun for me as I was the keynote speaker and had the opportunity to speak about the Changing World of Business Intelligence. Having been trained as a preacher, this was the closest to that type of speaking I have done in some time. We had a good, interactive audience for this event. I also presented on Power BI at this event, once again introducing a lot of people to what Microsoft is doing with BI these days.

CodeMastery – Minneapolis

Back home in Minneapolis, I participated in this CodeMastery as a speaker as well. At this event, I once again discussed the power of Power BI and Microsoft’s strategy. We had about 80 at this midweek event which was great.

Live 360 – Orlando

At Live! 360, I had the opportunity to speak at two of the 360 events – Modern Apps Live! and SQL Server Live! This event was a lot of fun to participate in. I had the opportunity to speak five times between the two events. The part that made all of this interesting was losing my harddrive that weekend. I had to rebuild demos and recover presentations all week long. Through it all I was able to get all but one presentation’s demo up and running. Funny thing though, I tweaked the demo, and it worked partly during the presentation. Nice job by 1105 to put this together. I look forward to being at the Vegas event in March.

CodeMastery – Boston

This event was also supposed to have happened by now, however, it was rescheduled to next week. If you are in the Boston area at the time, register for the event and join us for some free training. Hopefully, I will see you there.

Thanksgiving Day Survivor

Kid Pic PumpkinsAs I wrap up this post, I have to say a big “Thank You” to my family who has had to put up with a lot of travel over the past few weeks. Without their love and support this would have been a really rough time.

Turkey Image Source: