Category Archives: Microsoft SQL Server

TechFuse Minnesota Follow Up

 TechFuse Fall Edition

My Session: Using Azure SQL Database for Enterprise Needs

On 10/6/2015, I presented on Azure SQL Database at TechFuse Minnesota. Some of the highlights from the session included a comparison of the various SQL Server offerings and how Azure SQL Database fits into the overall picture. During the session we also discussed the importance of V12 and elastic databases (still in preview) for the enterprise environment. I was also raised and discussed the cloudy concerns including data safety, data compliance, data privacy and business continuity. With the ongoing changes Microsoft makes in this space, expect more changes to come. However, even today you can be successful using Azure SQL Database for your enterprise needs.

The presentation can be found in PDF format here.

Microsoft has a wealth of documentation which can be found here:

Questions from the Session

How are upgrades handled in Azure SQL Database?

Most upgrades to Azure SQL Database are seamless to us. However, they have made changes over the years which have required some intervention. One such change was the move from Web and Business Service Tiers to Basic, Standard, and Premium. In this case Microsoft provided a lot of guidance around the process and it was very easy to do in most cases. The most recent instance was the move to V12. Once again Microsoft provided the upgrade path in documentation. Both upgrades could be handled in the portal. However, V12 was a significant change so groups needed to do more testing prior to an upgrade.

Microsoft’s Azure upgrades for Azure SQL Database over the past couple of years:

Can we use Point in Time Restore to recover a table or to recover to a new database?

Point in Time Restore allows us to recover databases to specific points in time. Each service tier has different amounts they retain: Basic-7 days, Standard-14 days; Premium-35 days. Azure SQL Database always recovers the database to a new database. This means you can either “swap” the database once it is recovered or move the items you need to recover from the new database. One word of caution, you need to have the DTU capability to run both databases on the server to support the restore capability. Be sure to plan the recovery process and clean up when you have completed your recovery.

Thanks again to everyone who could attend this year.

Until the next session …

Part 3 Adding Tab Controls – Create your own SQL tools with PowerShell and windows forms


James recently published part 3 of his PowerShell and Windows Forms series for creating your own SQL Tools. In this post, he guides you through the process of adding tab controls. Enjoy!

Originally posted on JamesDataTechQ:

Using Tab Controls can help you organize and define your work space. In this blog post, I am going to be adding Tab Controls with the following Tab Pages for CPU, Disk, Memory to my SQL Tool app. I am going to highlight how you can take my code and add your own Tab Pages to meet your needs. Drop me a comment and let me know how your SQL Tool app is coming along or if you want me to cover a topic. Check out Part One where I introduced the SQL Tool app and in Part Two were I went over how to add a new Check Box.


Adding New Tab Pages

Step 1.

For example, you want to add a new Tab Page called Tempdb , under the heading called #Form Setup, you will need to add a new system Tab Page object.

$TempDBPage = New-Object…

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Part2 Adding a New CheckBox – Create your own SQL tools with PowerShell and Windows forms


This is James’ second post on creating SQL tools with PowerShell and Windows forms. James is a DBA responsible for the management of a large number of SQL Server instances.

Originally posted on JamesDataTechQ:

This blog post is about adding a new CheckBox to the SQL Tool base form from my first blog post. In the first blog post I just gave an introduction on the SQL Tool, now this is where the fun starts getting creative by adding your own SQL queries and PowerShell scripts. How cool is that! You’re making your own SQL tools tailored to your own needs. The CheckBox that I am going to be adding is for an SQL process, but it is universal. The CheckBox is just starting a PowerShell Function, what ever you dream up you can start that process from your own SQL Tool. If you started making your own SQL Tools or you would like for me to cover a topic please leave me a comment.

Add a new CheckBox

Step 1. In this step we will be adding a new CheckBox object called…

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Create your own SQL Tools with PowerShell and Windows Forms


Check out a new blogger who is sharing secrets of the DBA world. In his first post, James shows us how to create your very own SQL tool using PowerShell and Windows Form.

Originally posted on JamesDataTechQ:

By combining PowerShell and Windows Forms you can create your own SQL Tools. From the Windows Form you can execute your SQL and PowerShell scripts with just a couple clicks of a mouse. The added bonus is now your scripts are in a central location that is tailored to your needs.   I have created a base form below so you can get started adding you own scripts. If you’re new to PowerShell save the code below as a ps1 file and then run it from the PowerShell.


####################### PowerShell Code ###############################

function CreateForm {
Add-Type -AssemblyName System.Windows.Forms
Add-Type -AssemblyName System.drawing

$form1 = New-Object System.Windows.Forms.Form
$button1 = New-Object System.Windows.Forms.Button
$button2 = New-Object System.Windows.Forms.Button
$checkBox1 = New-Object System.Windows.Forms.CheckBox
$checkBox2 = New-Object System.Windows.Forms.CheckBox
$InitialFormWindowState = New-Object System.Windows.Forms.FormWindowState

#Form Parameter
$form1.Text = “My PowerShell Form”
$form1.Name = “form1”
$form1.DataBindings.DefaultDataSourceUpdateMode =…
$System_Drawing_Size = New-Object System.Drawing.Size
$System_Drawing_Size.Width = 550
$System_Drawing_Size.Height = 150
$form1.ClientSize = $System_Drawing_Size


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