Tag Archives: Minnesota

Minnesota BI User Group – Powering Up HDInsight with Power BI (December 2015)

On Wednesday, December 16, I presented on this topic at the Minnesota BI User Group.  This session is based on five blog posts that I created in August 2015.

You can find the presentation here: Powering Up HDInsight with Power BI (pdf).

The details can be found in the blog posts noted below:

HDInsight-Series-Featured-Pic_thumb

Setting Up and HDInsight Cluster (No Scripts Required)

Exploring the Microsoft Azure HDInsight Query Console (No Scripting Required)

Uploading Files to an HDInsight Cluster (No Scripting Required)

Using Power BI with HDInsight Part 1: Power Query and Files

Using Power BI with HDInsight Part 2: Power BI Desktop and Hive

My goals for this series

1. Document using Power BI with HDInsight

2. Prove that you can set up a HDInsight Cluster with no scripts

Other References from the Session

Azure: http://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/

Cloud Berry: http://www.cloudberrylab.com/free-microsoft-azure-explorer.aspx

 

Thanks for attending my session.

Powering Up HDInsight with Power BI–

On Tuesday, September 15, I presented on this topic for Pragmatic Works. You can find that session here. This session is based on five blog posts that I created in August 2015.

Powering Up HDInsight with Power BI (pdf)https://dataonwheels.files.wordpress.com/2016/02/powering-up-hdinsight-with-power-bi.pdffoundin the

HDInsight Series Featured Pic

Setting Up and HDInsight Cluster (No Scripts Required)

Exploring the Microsoft Azure HDInsight Query Console (No Scripting Required)

Uploading Files to an HDInsight Cluster (No Scripting Required)

Using Power BI with HDInsight Part 1: Power Query and Files

Using Power BI with HDInsight Part 2: Power BI Desktop and Hive

My goals for this series

1. Document using Power BI with HDInsight

2. Prove that you can set up a HDInsight Cluster with no scripts

Other References from the Session

Azure: http://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/

Cloud Berry: http://www.cloudberrylab.com/free-microsoft-azure-explorer.aspx

Wrap Up from the Session

A few questions were asked during the session and I wanted to handle some of them here.

Why did you not use Azure Resource Manager to deploy storage?

I did this as simple as possible and did not need to use the Resource Manager for my demos. However, if you need to rebuild the cluster quickly, the Azure Resource Manager would be a good option. Find out more here: https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/documentation/articles/hdinsight-provision-clusters/. This site will also walk through scripts and other options for setting up HDInsight clusters.

Why didn’t the table structure show up in the Power Query demo?

The Power Query demo worked with the data from a file approach. This approach is more “raw”. The files did not have column headers, so no headers were created in the table. However, when working with the Power BI Desktop demo, I used Hive. The table was defined in Hive and were easily seen. This is another case for using Hive or something similar to define the schema for ease of use.

What are the differences between Hadoop, Hortonworks, and HDInsight?

Starting from the top, Hadoop is the Adobe open source specification. All of the products listed above are based on Hadoop. Hadoop

Hortonworks and Cloudera are examples of Hadoop distributions. These companies have worked with the various versions of open source technologies around Hadoop and created a supported distribution as a result.

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Finally, HDInsight is Microsoft’s cloud-based Hadoop implementation. They continue to add functionality including Spark, R, Giraph, and Solr. You can expect Microsoft to continue to grow the capabilities of HDInsight as part of their cloud-based analytics solutions.

Thanks for attending my session.

PASSMN–Passing the Baton: A Board Transition Story

Each year the Minnesota SQL Server User Group elects new board members and resets its leadership team.  I have been on the board for the past three years during which we switched term lengths to two years with staggered elections, but more about that later.

PASSMNLogoDuring the PASS Summit this past year I had the privilege of hosting a table during the Chapter Leaders meeting on building boards and recruiting leadership for SQL Server User Groups.  First, I have to say, leadership teams/boards come in many flavors, counts, etc.  For instance, some groups are managed by one or two people who are truly passionate about the community and really enjoy leading the groups.  Other groups, such as ours, have regular elections with as few as three and as many as eight on the board.  While I may spend more time later discussing the pros and cons of various approaches, this post is about the peaceful transition within our user group.

First a bit of history, I have worked with the Minnesota SQL Server User Group for a number of years.  We joined PASS quite a while ago but a few years after we started.  After joining we did not change our organizational structure.  We have always had a board of four or more.  We currently have six roles: Chair, Corporate Relations, Programs, Membership and Treasurer, Technology, and SQL Saturday.  We added SQL Saturday last year to have someone focused entirely on getting that program rolling, Paul (@mnDBA) did great!  I have held the Corporate Relations role and this year I was the Chair.

Elections and Role Distribution

Prior to last year, our terms were one year.  However, we rotated the entire board at least once which is very difficult. So, starting last year, we rotate 1/2 of the board each year with terms running twoelection button years.  What is really cool about our election process is that we are able to recruit new board members each year allowing PASSMN to take on some new ideas without issue.   We have also done a good job of mixing up members between consulting and nonconsulting members.  We also try to limit a company’s participation to one board member.  This process has been successful for years as this blend has motivated time changes, content direction and even sponsorships through the years.

Another unique part of our board election is that members are voted to the board, not to a role.  This is strategic as it allows the members to rotate roles as well as work with each other to find a good fit for them within the board.  It also means that the nominees understand that they will work with their fellow members to distribute responsibility.

Transition Lunch

That leads us to today.  We had our transition lunch 12/12/12 at 12:12. (Yes, that was the actual appointment time, and we survived.)  Once again we had a good time as volunteers reflecting on what happened in the past year, allowing the new board to select roles, and handing off insights as we have them.  And thus, it is the beginning of the end for me as a board member.

It’s Been Great!

Personally, it has been and will continue to be great working with such a good group of people.  Thanks to Andy (@SQLQuill)  and Tim (@tjplas) for the time these past couple of years and we welcome Shirley (@SQLLatina), Will (@williamweber), and Mike (@SQLMD) to the board along with returning members Paul, Josh (@SQLJosh) and Bill (@billpreachuk).  I plan to continue working with the board and helping with some of their new initiatives this next year.  Let’s keep the tradition of quality and fun going.