Excel BI Tip #27: CUBESET and CUBESETCOUNT Functions

As I mentioned in my original post, Exploring Excel 2013 as Microsoft’s BI Client, I will be posting tips regularly about using Excel 2013 and later.  Much of the content will be a result of my daily interactions with business users and other BI devs.  In order to not forget what I learn or discover, I write it down … here.  I hope you too will discover something new you can use.  Enjoy!

CUBE Function Overview

In Tip #18, I talked about the CUBEMEMBER and CUBEVALUE functions which can be used to refer to cube data directly. In this tip, we will look at CUBESET and CUBESETCOUNT. These functions return sets that can be applied to the CUBEVALUE function like the CUBEMEMBER function. They allow you to create custom sets which can be used for calculations such as trailing 12 months, top 10 performers, or the number of customers with sales in 2009. Keep in mind that the advantage of using the CUBE functions with SSAS data is that it allows you to go beyond the limiting capabilities of pivot tables using that data and MDX.

CUBESET Function

The CUBESET function is designed to return a valid MDX Set from the cube or tabular model. The construction of the formula is CUBESET(“connection”,”set expression”,”caption”,”sort order”, “sort by”). Only the connection and set expression are required. However, I highly recommend using the caption. The caption is what will show in the cell with the formula. If you don’t include the caption, the cell will appear empty so you will need mark it in some way. Before I started using the caption, I color coded the cell so I would make sure not to overwrite that cell. In a nutshell, use a caption to make your solution more usable.

Simple Set Example

In this example, we are going to pick a list of college level Education attribute members from the Adventure Works sample cube. Education is an attribute hierarchy that is part of the Customer dimension. Here is the MDX for that set:

{[Customer].[Education].&[Bachelors], [Customer].[Education].&[Graduate Degree]}

Here is how I used that in Excel with the CUBESET function (AdvWorks is my connection name).

=CUBESET(“AdvWorks”,”{[Customer].[Education].&[Bachelors], [Customer].[Education].&[Graduate Degree]}”,”Completed College”)

While this is a simple example, any MDX set will work in the expression. If you need to create a set dynamically such as a Trailing 12 Months or Top 10 set it will work just as well. Work out the set in SQL Server Management Studio and then put it into a cell and refer to that cell when creating your cube value.

CUBESETCOUNT Function

The CUBESETCOUNT function can be used to count the members in a set returned by a a CUBESET function. In MDX we use .count or COUNT() to determine the number of members in a set. This does not work with the CUBESET function and thus we have CUBESETCOUNT. This is a fairly simple function to use, but it is very powerful if you are trying to do dynamic set counts based on reference data on your spreadsheet.

Counting a Set of Customers with Sales for the Selected Period

In this example, we have created a set which returns customers with orders in 2011. We will count this set using the CUBESETCOUNT function to determine the count. In Excel, we could use the NOW() function to get the current year or some other dynamic value to build the set. However, Adventure Works is a static set so I am using a single year in the example.

nonempty( {([Customer].[Customer].[Customer],[Measures].[Internet Order Quantity])},[Date].[Calendar].[Calendar Year].&[2010])

This can be put into a CUBESET function as follows:

=CUBESET(“AdvWorks”,”nonempty( {([Customer].[Customer].[Customer],[Measures].[Internet Order Quantity])},[Date].[Calendar].[Calendar Year].&[2010])”)

Next, we put the CUBESET function into the CUBESETCOUNT function.

=CUBESETCOUNT( CUBESET(“AdvWorks”,”nonempty( {([Customer].[Customer].[Customer],[Measures].[Internet Order Quantity])},[Date].[Calendar].[Calendar Year].&[2010])”))

This can now be used as a value for other calculations. For example, you could show the average sale amount for customers who purchased something this year or even the average purchase amount this year for those who ordered last year to see if your repeat customers are buying more.

Wrap Up

Using these functions with other CUBE functions increases the flexibility of your dashboard solution and allows you to make many more creative visualizations. Remember to use captions with CUBESET functions you plan to use in your formulas and you need a CUBESET result to count with CUBESETCOUNT.

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