Exploring Excel 2013 for BI Tip #14: Sparklines and Pivot Tables

7 01 2014

As I mentioned in my original post, Exploring Excel 2013 as Microsoft’s BI Client, I will be posting tips regularly about using Excel 2013.  Much of the content will be a result of my daily interactions with business users and other BI devs.  In order to not forget what I learn or discover, I write it down … here.  I hope you too will discover something new you can use.  Enjoy!

Sparklines and Dashboards

There are a lot of visualization possibilities with Excel. When creating dashboards, sparklines are a good visualization of what happened over a data series. My goal was to add sparklines to a pivot table so it could be added to a dashboard. After many failed attempts, I was able to get the following to work.

On the INSERT tab, you will find the Sparklines options. In my pivot table I am going to add Line and Column Sparkline visualizations using the MyVote submission counts.

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Here are the steps that I used to add this visualization to my pivot table.

First, I created a pivot table with Submission Count as the measure, the rows were the Poll Categories, and the columns are the quarters of the year. Here is what the original data looks like.

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In this case, I kept the Grand Totals for both columns and rows turned on. I am going to use these areas as the targets for the sparklines. I am going to use lines for trends over time on the Grand Total column. Then I am going to use the column visualization to show the category distribution on Grand Total row.

Adding the Line Sparkline

To add the line sparkline, select all of the data cells (no grand totals). Next, select the Line Sparkline option. This will open the Create Sparklines dialog. In the dialog, you can see the Data Range is already populated with the highlighted cells. The Location Range is empty as shown below.

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Next, you select the columns in the Grand Total column, and that cell range will be added to the Location Range field. This will put the sparklines in those columns and they will match the data trend. For clarity, the final step would be to change the column name to “Trend” and change the font color to white so the text is not seen. Here is the result.

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Adding the Column Sparkline

Next up, we will add the Column Sparkline. Highlight the same cells as before. Once the cells have been highlighted, select the Column Sparkline option. Select the Grand Total row for the location. This will show the distribution within the quarter for the categories. Changing the font to white does not hide the value in this case. I actually reduced the font size to 1 to make it nearly invisible. (There is no transparent font available.) Here is the result.

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I also added lower right corner by selecting the Grand Total column cells as the data and that cell as the location to get a consistent look at distribution. One other note, the Grand Total row is called “Trend” as well because they have to have the same name. But, overall, this was the look I was working toward.

Limitations and Nuances with Sparklines

Now for the stuff that doesn’t work as you would like. Sparklines are technically not part of the pivot table. As a result, the table needs to be static in shape. This means rows and columns need to stay the same in count and position.

I am going to add a category slicer to my example. When I select the Entertainment category, all of the sparklines are “stranded” in space. Quarter 2 disappears because it has no data and as a result the trendlines are no longer in the table. This is also true for the columns as four categories are eliminated by the filter. Worse yet, if you look at the filter, you will notice we have no poll submissions in the News category. When that is added the sparklines will end up in the last data row as opposed to the Grand Total sections.

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Sparklines are a nice tool to have, but you need to understand what is the best way to use them in the context of what you are doing.

Reference and Credit

I ran across this during my search for how sparklines work in pivot tables: http://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/office/forum/office_2010-excel/how-do-you-insert-a-sparkline-into-a-pivot-table/e072570d-b367-41f1-b2d6-2dbe939db311.  As I note with the limitations to my solution, the forum post above calls out some alternatives which allow for more dynamic approaches, but they also involve coding. Furthermore, the comment from Andrew Lavinsky (MVP) confirmed that this was possible and that it is supported in SharePoint Excel Services.





Exploring Excel 2013 for BI Tip #10: The Data Bar

30 07 2013

As I mentioned in my original post, Exploring Excel 2013 as Microsoft’s BI Client, I will be posting tips regularly about using Excel 2013.  Much of the content will be a result of my daily interactions with business users and other BI devs.  In order to not forget what I learn or discover, I write it down … here.  I hope you too will discover something new you can use.  Enjoy!

Using the Data Bar

This feature has been a part of Excel for a long time.  However, as with any tool, some of the oldies are really good.  As a BI architect who worked with SQL Server tools, I am always amazed at what has been around in Excel for years.  So as part of this series, I will also highlight some important visualizations that have been around.

What is the Data Bar?

The data bar is a conditional formatting feature that can be applied to cells in Excel.  Data bars “fill” the cell proportionally based on the data that the formatting is applied to.  Data bars work with pivot table and standard data in Excel.  Our focus will be on using the data bar with pivot tables.

You will find the option to add data bars on the Conditional Formatting button on the HOME ribbon as shown below.

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As you can see Data Bars are one option under Conditional Formatting.  Look for future tips to come on some of the other Conditional formatting options.

Adding Data Bars

The following sample is from the MyVote data generated from the Modern Apps Live! project.  In this sample, I have a simple pivot table which shows the Age range and number of poll submissions as shown below.

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To add data bars highlight the area to add the bars and choose a format.

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Advanced Settings

By clicking More Rules … you will be able to apply advanced options.

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In my opinion, the most important setting to use here is at the top.  When working with pivot tables, you should at least choose Apply Rule to “All cells showing {field name} values.” By choosing this option, if new row values are added, the data bars will be appropriately applied. This also is necessary for filters and slicers to work correctly.

However, this option will also highlight the any total columns (in our case Grand Total was included).  If you only want counts with the row labels, you would choose “All cells showing “{field name}” values for “{field name}”.   You will find that this is the most common option to select when using data bars for data visualization.

Modifying Existing Data Bars

Once it has been added, you can modify the data bar choosing the Manage Rules option in the Conditional Formatting drop down.  This will open a dialog box which has the formatting rules for the selected pivot table.  There is a drop down, which allows you to select the rules for the sheet or other parts of the workbook.  From here you can see all of the rules applied and can edit the rule, create a new rule, delete a rule, or reorder the rules.

Data bars are a simple, but effective data visualization when you need to highlight the variance between values.  With the ability to apply the data bar to a field in a pivot table, it becomes a flexible visualization as well with very little effort involved.





PowerPoint–My Dashboard and Report Design Tool

20 03 2013

At some point I think that I am becoming a Microsoft OfficeMALL13_Badge_See125x125 specialist as opposed to a BI Architect.  All of this work in Excel and now PowerPoint.  Okay, done with the ramblings.  As I have noted in a couple previous posts, I am working with a team on the Modern Apps Live! conference which is in Vegas next week.  Well, this is another “lesson learned” that I wanted to pass along as a result of doing that work.  (Hope to see you there.)

Using PowerPoint 2013

Microsoft Powerpoint 2013 IconSo I had to create two types of data visualizations for this conference.  Usually, I would use paper or white board to sketch it out and then proceed to make it a reality.  Somewhere along the way, I heard that Microsoft uses PowerPoint to lay out UIs.  Not sure if it is true or not, but it seemed easier and less expensive than Blend or Visio, so I thought I would give it a try.

So, I first needed to create a summary report for a poll within the app that was created.  I used the standard tools with in PowerPoint such as tables, charts, text boxes, and images to mock up my report.  What I liked was I was able to add notations to the mockup for future reference.

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I had some frustration creating the charts as I wanted them to be representative.  But overall not a bad experience.  The next task I was taking on was working with the dashboards I was going to create in Excel 2013.  I still wanted to lay it out so I knew what I would be trying to design.  This was when I stumbled onto the Storyboarding menu.

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I actually like using the shapes in this toolset better.  Turns out this is available when you install Visual Studio Ultimate, Visual Studio Premium (my version), or Visual Studio Test Professional.  More on that can be found on MSDN – Storyboard Using PowerPoint.  This can be integrated into TFS and directly associated to work items.  I am not a UX expert, but I like the ability to add tabs like I will have in Excel and there is even a SharePoint page background.

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However, as you can see, even if you don’t have Storyboarding you can still effectively build up a PowerPoint slide to look like the report, dashboard, or even SharePoint page.  I was not sure if I would be able to embrace this, but in the end I really like the simplicity and using PowerPoint allows for comments, versioning in SharePoint, and other mechanisms to support dashboard design.

I also wanted to pass along another blog post I found from Jason Zander on the Windows Azure team on the same subject:  My Favorite Features: Creating Storyboards with PowerPoint.  Hopefully this gives you another simple way to mock up reports and dashboards when you can’t find that User Experience Pro.








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