Exploring Excel 2013 for BI Tip #2: Show Details

13 02 2013

As I mentioned in my original post, Exploring Excel 2013 as Microsoft’s BI Client, I will be posting tips regularly about using Excel 2013.  Much of the content will be a result of my daily interactions with business users and other BI devs.  In order to not forget what I learn or discover, I write it down … here.  I hope you too will discover something new you can use.  Enjoy!

Show Details

So, you have connected Excel to your SSAS cube.  You really wish you could easily drill to details using Excel.   You can do this in Excel 2013 by double clicking the cell or right clicking the cell to get the shortcut menu which includes the option as well.

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It is really cool that you can just double-click the cell and get there directly.  By default, it returns the first thousand rows of detail from the underlying cube data.

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You can change this in the connection options for your SSAS connection.

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One “gotcha” on this is that It doesn’t work on a calculated cell, but it works fine on standard measures.  If you use a lot of calculated members, you will get the error in both cases.  So if this option is important for the users of a specific calculation, you may need to get it into cube as a standard, not calculated, measure.





Exploring Excel 2013 for BI Tip #1: Quick Explore

8 02 2013

As I mentioned in my original post, Exploring Excel 2013 as Microsoft’s BI Client, I will be posting tips regularly about using Excel 2013.  Much of the content will be a result of my daily interactions with business users and other BI devs.  In order to not forget what I learn or discover, I write it down … here.  I hope you too will discover something new you can use.  Enjoy!

Quick Explore

So, you have connected Excel to your SSAS cube.  You really wish you could cross drill easily in the product.  If you have used PerformancePoint Services you know the process.  Right click on the bar or cell and then choose the dimension to drill to using the information you clicked on as a starting point.  You can now do this in Excel 2013 using Quick Explore.  Here’s how to do it.

1. Click on a cell and hover over it.

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2. Click the Quick Explore button a.k.a. magnifying glass and lightning bolt.  That will pop up the following dialog box.

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In this box, you can see that the cell has focus on “Boston” based on context and is drilling into the Geography hierarchy of the Client dimension based on the selected filters and slice of data we are focused on.

3. Click the Drill To target.  Excel will create a new view of the Pivot Table with the Drill to on the row as shown here with the filter still in place.

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4. Going back…  One of those frustrating things with this is how do I go back to my original view.  Ironically, you use Undo.  This will reset the view back to the previous.  So, if you choose to drill into this data again and again, you have to Undo that many operations to get back to the starting point.  Of course, can click the arrow by the arrow to see your “bread crumb” and pick where you want to go back to as well.

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Until the next tip…





Join Me at Modern Apps Live! Las Vegas

5 02 2013

ModernAppsLive

If you are familiar at all with Visual Studio Live! then you should check out this new conference.  At the Vegas conference, I am participating in this unique three-day event which is a series of sessions that build on each other as the conference progresses called Modern Apps Live! The goal is to do a end-to-end application build during which the presenters build the application as well as focus on Application Lifecycle Management, best practices, tools, and a variety of technologies.

I will be presenting on the database design and business intelligence components of the solution and would love to see you there.  To make this even sweeter, if you register with the following code, MVSPK3, you will qualify for one of the following offers:

  • The 5 day all-access Best Value Conference Package for just $1,595 – a savings of $500.00 off the standard price of $2,095! (*Includes pre and post conference events.)

OR:

  • The 3 day Modern Apps Live! Conference for just $1,295 – a savings of $400.00 off the standard price of $1,695

This is for new registrants only.  Make sure to use the code by February 27, 2013, to take advantage of the full discount.

Also keep in mind that you will be able to take advantage of the Visual Studio Live! sessions as well as this is a cohosted conference.

I hope to see many of you there!





Exploring Excel 2013 as Microsoft’s Business Intelligence Client

4 02 2013

Excel 2013 LogoA little over six months ago, I wrote an article on Magenic.com about Excel 2013’s Impact for BI Users.  This coincided with the Office 2013 Preview release.  I discussed the addition of Power View and PowerPivot into the product.   Last week, I followed that article up with another on the fact that Excel appears to be Microsoft’s BI client platform now and into the future.

It appears that I am not alone in this assessment.  Michael Koploy of Software Advice, a company that reviews BI software, did a Q&A session with Rob Collie, a.k.a. PowerPivotPro ( T | B ), where Rob came to some similar conclusions.  He notes that “the powerpivotprotoday[1]inclusion of PowerPivot in 2013 is a major inflection point” for users to implement BI in Excel more fully.  I really like his take on the relationship between BI specialists and IT pros and the end users of Excel.  Microsoft has been pushing a concept of BI for the masses and ironically today’s Excel is the helping this happen.  Check out the rest of the Q&A about whether Excel is the next great BI tool for more insights from Rob.

As I start to deliver more solutions with customers using Excel, SharePoint and soon Office365, I am going to kick off a new series here on my blog – Excel 2013 BI Tips.  My goal is to document XLTipsthose tips, tricks and discoveries from my journey with the new Excel.  Some of them may be seem common, but I just don’t want to forget so I will be noting them as well.  Join me for this interesting journey through Excel and BI.








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